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would not be able to handle a nuclear emergency similar to the events unfoiledding in japan. however, administrator craig fugate told a senate committee yesterday the government as a whole is better prepared to deal with emergencies than it was before hurricane katrina. also testifying, the former inspector general who assessed fema operations since the hurricane. this is about two hours. >> the hearing will come to order. i thank everyone for their patience. as you know we had two votes on the floor. so we delayed the start of the hearing. i welcome, everyone. we convene this hearing which had been long-planned, long-scheduled on fema's ability to respond to a major catastrophe against the compelling backdrop of the tragically catastrophic events unfolding in japan. an earthquake and tsunami in rapid succession that have already resulted in twice as many deaths as al qaeda's attack on america on 9/11. of course no one believes that the death, and finding of the dead is over yet. the earthquake and tsunami have also caused fires and explosions at nuclear power plants that could have
as they were assembling last night. it is all but eclipsed by japan and the earthquake followed by the tsunami. guest: i just came back from japan as a part of a congressional exchange program. they are good allies. they have been an active member of the six-party talks in the region which is so very essential. this is just devastating. when you read the reports after you just met so many members and their leadership and you have been in their homes and you have had such in-depth discussions over three or four days, to see this happening is just devastating. japan is probably one of the most organized places i have ever visited. the streets are clean. the people are polite. there is a plan for everything that has to happen. i know that they have been preparing for a possible earthquake or tsunami for a long time. preparing for it and then responding when the tall buildings are shaking and people are losing their lives, hopefully the lives lost will be kept to a minimum because of the preparations. host: this is also a domestic story. the waves are beginning to reach the coastline in hawaii. it
-moon on the earthquake and tsunami in japan. he said they will do everything to help japan. we'll have that live on c-span2. in the meantime, anita in "washington journals" he's the ranking member on the subcommittee that covers foreign operations. >> host: thanks for being here. >> guest: my pleasure. >> host: wow, we have a lot going on today. i'm going to start with libya just because the secretary was talking about it. again leaders why europe are meeting, france is pushing for a no-fly zone. what are your thoughts about the u.s. involvement level? how big should it be? and why is that a good investment for this country? >> guest: it's clear to me after discussing it in depth with secretary clinton is the administration is actively involved in strategy sessions and discussions with the international community. the united states cannot act independently. and people may say no-fly zone, they may say -- they may come up with all kinds of actions, but number one, there are implication implications as secretary gates said to every one the proposals. unless we act with the international community, i do
countries? if there is any other country i would move to, it would be japan because they are such a great country. i want to say that we do not need to by our friends via financial aid. this is ridiculous. host: we do not need to by our friends. guest: is a matter of developing or alliances, working together in the interest of the united states of america. in haiti, when there is poverty and people do not have homes or a place to live, it is not a matter of buying our friends but to make sure we can bring stability in the country because they are right on our border. the same thing with mexico. people travel everywhere and we are all interconnected. i hope that in addition to suppor >> in about 20 minutes we will take you live to the white house for a news conference with president obama. among the possible topics, libya and the impact of the sue tsunan the west coast. live coverage when it starts, scheduled now for 12:30 eastern, and can we'll have that here on c-span2. a new member of congress, kevin yoder, a freshman representative from kansas who also sits on the gop's appropriations
and tsunami story. the associated press has just announced and msnbc has tweeted that japan is issuing an evacuation order to thousands of residents near a nuclear power plant. certainly, we will keep an eye on this. we will keep an eye on breaking news. this is a big day for people who are following what is going on in the world. jobs. i pulled the baltimore sun because it is typical of what is going on a run the country. home sales rising. we look at your own on and on the rate in kansas and kansas city and the city itself. what is happening with jobs in your district? against coke the job numbers that you are refering to -- guest: the job numbers that you are referring to -- the economy is probably stronger -- keep tax rates low and below regulatory environment in kansas. we try to foster innovation through small businesses. we try to be very welcome to capital and growth. one of the things we are focused on in the kansas city is bioscience. host: arthur government subsidies supporting that? ? there are research dollars the come to our university. as i said, we are making these redu
candidate. he talked about the pentagon budget and japan's nuclear power crisis. this was hosted by the ideal love republican party in davenport. it's 25 minutes. >> thank you very much. congratulations on this. it happened i got to speak at the first state party event at the chairman some of you may remember in july and in 2009 with the rising stars. the great event, read energy, great fun, and i told people at home he is going to be first-rate chairman. i picked up the three, and a former county chairmen. i was the county chairmen in my county twice, once for four years and once for six years and i'm going to just tell you this is where the elections were won. they were here where the rubber meets the road. >> judy, thank you for the work that you do. [applause] >> i would be here on march 15th, but i not going to have anybody to stand behind me. >> i'm really glad to be here for the kickoff the series speaker event because we are getting ready for something very important. the 2012 election is going to be a watershed election in american history. matt didn't go into all of my
, be it in japan or china, what happens in afghanistan, pakistan, is certainly relevant to our own security here. i mentioned the banks before because i am very concerned about jobs in west chester county. i have worked hard to get fda loans so we can help businesses expand. in terms of international assistance, again, we export to japan. they export to us. we export to china. we are all interconnected. when there are asian flus, they are exported as well. i would be happy to talk to you further. host: we are trying to give you some news updates on the earthquake and tsunami as we talk here about these federal spending priorities. this is a sad story. as many as 300 bodies have been found in one city. the next telephone call as we talk about foreign spending with congresswoman nita lowey. this is a real personal story for her this morning. caller: i just want to say that i believe in giving foreign aid to people because people around the world need the help. a lot of the money goes to governments that keep it for themselves. as i was growing up as a kid, [unintelligible] i think they need to do a l
major contributors. japan for example, provides the salaries for afghan police. there is another fund to which nato-isaf countries contribute, but again it is the afghan secret forces fund that is without question. >> does that 20-24% cut which i believe is in the c.r. and h.r.-1, how does that affect its? >> when that hits, and again, we project that that would hit perhaps sometime in june, that would have an enormous affect, a negative effect on our effort, needless to say. and it would undermine, it would undercut our efforts to develop the enablers. because again, we've always had a progression that first you develop the guys that can help you in the fight, actually out there against the insurgents. and gradually build institutions, the ministries, the branch schools, leader developer courses. by the way, literacy programs have featured very probably now. we finally bit the program -- bit the bullet. with basic training we also do basic literacy now and we're way over 100,000 that have been either train or in the process. >> can you provide a timeline then? getting the independenc
to the people of japan, as they work to recover from one of the worst natural disasters in their history. for many years now, japan has been a stall wart partner in afghanistan, an important contributor to the mission there. now our thoughts and our prayers are with our long-time allies and with all those in japan effected by the earthquake and tsunami. >> i can say i believe every person on the committee and every american as well. thank you for doing that. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> as a bottom line up front, it is isaf's assessment that the momentum achieved by the taliban since 2005 has been arrested inch of the country and reversed in a number of important areas. however, while the security progress achieved over the past year is significant, it is also tragedy i will and reversible. moreover, it is clear that much difficult work lies ahead with our afghan partners to solidify and expand our gains in the face of the expected taliban spring offensive. nonetheless, the hard fought achievements in 2010 and early 2011 have enabled the joint afghan nato transition board to recommend
of that decade. one thinks of japan where there was no return of growth until the beginning of this decade. how could you possibly attribute to the government as you do? >> i'm grateful for the honorable gentleman's point we have argued consistently and so has the international community that we had a financial crisis from 2008 and 2009. and out of that crisis without making references to tsunamis and earthquakes there are many after-shocks and it takes much time to actually get over that. so i certainly agree with that point. but it was not us who said that we were going to raise growth in last year. it was the conservative government. and the honorable member from chichester when he pointed out that under a labour government we had 40% debt in relation to gross domestic product. my recollection in some years it was 37%. it was the financial crisis that pushed it up to where it was. >> i'm very grateful from my honorable friend giving way. would he also say that's particularly startling after all the motions we've heard from the chancellor and the budget, the growth forecast is actually after
deemployed in japan. it did very well. the team over was were not affected by the recent events in japan. we're thankful for that. it is connected to the c2bmc in hawaii, and as said before, our ship, especially our surveillance capability in the sea of japan is shown here. this is our initial capability. it shows one layer of defense in the three charts i've just shown. next chart. when we moved to 2015, our aim is to go from an initial capability to a robust capability. again, how do you define "robust?" there's not a clear definition, and i'll state what the agency adopted and in concert with the ballistic missile defense review conducted last year was one interpretation of robust, and it's ours is that when a missile's launched at you, you have opportunities to shoot it with multiple systems, independent technologies engaging that are integrated together through a center network again taking multiple views using multiple freak sighs so that -- frequencies to that is makes it very resilient capability, and by 2015 with the introduction of the sm32a, you can also see the introduction on th
and japan's statistics, they are lower than ours. if any, these are optimistic figures. >> that is exactly right. japan as you probably all know has a birthrate not of 2.0, but more like 1.25. their population, i think, is about in 2005 has been declining even though people are living so much longer. their population is declining and they have essentially no net immigration, so we are still having at least essentially replacement birthrates and having net immigration so good point. our problem is significant, but it's actually worse eel where, so -- elsewhere, so if that's solace, that's real good news. again, if you look at the birthrate at 2.0, add in the net immigration, it makes the equivalent of 2.3. that means while the birthrate dropped from about 3 down to 2 with the help of immigration it's 2.3. it's not quite as bad as just looking at birth rates, but it's still very, very significant. now, the imp nations of all of this -- implications on all of this in social security and beyond social security currently, we can look at what has happened to the relationship between the number o
't know. talk to carter center. >> do you have any information to north korea and japan? >> i don't, no. i don't. michelle in the back. then david. >> i have a question about pakistan. in the wake of the ray davis case, as the u.s. been pulling any u.s. personnel out of pakistan? >> no. not -- certainly not i'm aware of it. i don't believe we have. in the days immediately following the resolution of mr. davis' case, we were certainly on a heightened security awareness. but there's been no measures to reduce our footprint in pakistan. in fact, i would say we're getting back to business as usual in terms of cooperating with the pakistani government and the pakistani people in trying to forward our agenda there which is to build pakistani institutions and capacity to bring greater economic prosperity and political freedom there. >> if i could just follow up. there was a report that the pakistani have given the u.s. a list of people that they were going to declare persona grata on the militarying a sis? -- military agencies? >> i'm not aware of that. go ahead. >> are you aware that they have i
, russia, west europe, and japan and turkey. they preface pages xv to 17 spells out the inputs that the task force had. sometimes brilliant background papers in the end of the report, and particularly one just published on women in afghanistan on the perspective of somebody who was under cover trying to maintain women's schools during taliban rule in their country. with background meetings in a dozen capitols, including a meeting with afghan on all sides from senior officials to the kabul government to the political opposition within that political system to civil society to, yes, persons intimately linked to the insurgency. and we at century, my colleague michael hannah and we provided the kind of support that handwriting what was being told to us by the wisdom of those task force members. they set the course and it's to them that we now turn to outline to you our groups recommendations and findings. so tom? >> thank you very much, jeff, for your very kind introduction and for your setting the stage. i begin by saying the reports findings with the wildly varying were unanimous
problems, even to the point of crisis in the next few years. many people have said japan is locked in crisis, that crisis is coming because of the debt that they've accumulated. when that comes to america, do we want to have government by crisis? already we can't even pass a budget. we can't pass appropriations bills. our bills do not even go to the committees anymore. they just come to the floor and we put a patchwork quilt on them and there's a chance this ends up being two more weeks. it is not the way you should run government. if you want to have a significant plan for changing things, send things through the committee. if up to the have a realistic way of running government, have appropriations bills. if you want to be someone who believes in good, responsible government, for goodness sakes, pass a budget. we didn't pass a budget last year. this chart shows how big the problem is. i wish i had a magnifying glass because that's the only way you could see the other side's proposal. $6 billion in cuts. it's one day's borrowing. it's not even one day's spending that they're talki
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15